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Psalm 107

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The text of this Psalm is written in this picture in 26 circles that form a mandala, a circular design that can be used in meditation.  This picture changes like a kaleidoscope the longer one gazes at it.  The text begins with the circle in the center, moves counter-clockwise around six circles four times; and then concludes with the large circle on the outside. 
 
There are symbols here that are part of Sacred Geometry use in many mystical traditions all over the world.  Look at the six circles with text that are near the central circle with text, and who overlap each other.   Notice how this central circle overlaps all of these six circles.  The circumference of the central circle passes through the center points of all six circles.  This symbol formed by these seven circles is called 'The Seed of Life'.

There is another geometric symbol here.  It is based on the geometry I used in my pictures ‘The Seven Days of Creation’ and ‘The Holy Palace’.  Look at the six circles with text that are all touching the central circle.  Notice that these circles are touching each other and not overlapping.  See the orange Star of David (slightly tilted) in the spaces in-between the center circle and the six circles that surround it?  The symbol formed by these seven circles is called 'The Flower of Life'.

Psalm 107, called the Psalm of Thanksgiving, describes four perilous situations that could befall us.  It tells us that someone who has gone through any of these situations and survived has a special obligation to give thanks and praise to God.  There is even a special blessings to say in the synagogue when called to the Torah.
 
I survived a life-threatening illness, cancer.  I was diagnosed with advanced-stage Hotchkin’s lymphoma in 1986 and underwent eight months of aggressive chemotherapy.  It saved my life, introduced me to Jewish meditation, made me a more spiritual person - more openminded and less judgmental.  I thank God for allowing me to have survived, and in retrospect can see many good things that came from going through such a difficult ordeal.  That is why I appreciate the message of this Psalm of Thanksgiving, and made this picture.
 
The perilous situations described in Psalm 107 are:
 
1. Being lost in a desert and eventually finding civilization.
2. Being imprisoned or held in captivity and then released.
3. Having a life-threatening illness and recovering from it.
4. Being on a boat in an ocean storm and finding dry land.
 
The Psalm begins by saying, ‘Give thanks to God for He is good, for His kindness endures forever.  In all four situations, the text says, ‘They cried out to God in their distress and from their anguish He rescued them.’  After describing their rescue it says, ‘Let them thank God for His kindness and for His wonders to the children of Adam’.  The Psalm concludes by saying, ‘Whoever is wise should notice these things and contemplate the kindnesses of God’.